Culture and nature

Intangible Cultural Heritage

Cooperatives in Germany, yoga in India or rumba from Cuba - they all belong to the Intangible Cultural Heritage of UNESCO. More than 500 forms of Intangible Cultural Heritage are listed on the three UNESCO lists, over 90 on the Nationwide Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Germany.

ICH Lists

Germany's nationwide inventory comprises 97 elements: 88 forms of cultural practices and expressions, and nine examples of good safeguarding practices.

Nationwide Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage

Register of Good Safeguarding Practices

The three UNESCO lists count 508 elements corresponding to 122 countries.

UNESCO's lists of Intangible Cultural Heritage


Dances, theatre, music, traditions, festivals or crafts - intangible cultural heritage is carried by human knowledge and skills. It is an expression of creativity, conveys continuity and identity, and shapes societies. The 2003 Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage ensures its further development.

Germany’s Nationwide Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage

Germany ratified the UNESCO Convention in 2013 and committed itself to creating a nationwide inventory of intangible cultural heritage. By establishing this inventory, the importance of living heritage in general as well as individual forms of cultural practices and expressions in particular come to great public attention. Good safeguarding practices demonstrate how intangible cultural heritage is effectively passed on to the next generation.

The nationwide inventory is compiled in a multi-stage procedure by the German Commission for UNESCO, the federal states, the Standing Conference of Ministers of Education and Cultural Affairs, and the Federal Commissioner for Culture and the Media. Proposals for inscription are submitted by respective communities.  

The nationwide inventory comprises 97 elements: 88 forms of cultural expressions and nine examples of good safeguarding practices. The inventory is meant to grow from year to year. It is not a collection of “German heritage” but rather a reflection of the diversity of cultural practices and expressions that are practiced in Germany by various communities.

The inscribed elements and their bearers are exemplary for our society’s creativity, spirit of innovation and knowledge. Inscriptions on this inventory help to raise awareness about the importance of intangible cultural heritage and support safeguarding efforts by communities.

Nationwide Inventory of Intangible Heritage

National Register of Best Safeguarding Practices

    Publication

    Wissen. Können. Weitergeben..
    Deutsche UNESCO-Kommission, 2017

    UNESCO’s Lists of Intangible Cultural Heritage

    UNESCO runs three lists of Intangible Cultural Heritage: the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, the List of Intangible Cultural Heritage in Need of Urgent Safeguarding, and the Register of Good Safeguarding Practices.

    UNESCO's Representative List embodies the diversity of intangible cultural heritage worldwide. Its inscribed elements – such as Argentinean and Uruguayan tango, traditional Chinese medicine, and avalanche risk management in Austria and Switzerland – show how living heritage shapes identities and fosters social cohesion. The Intergovernmental Committee on Intangible Cultural Heritage decides on the inscription of cultural practices every year.

    Germany has inscribed four elements on the Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity:  

    Germany is also preparing nominations for the Representative List of Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity and for the Register of Good Safeguarding Practices:

    • Les techniques artisanales et les pratiques coutumières des ateliers de cathédrales, ou « Bauhütten », en Europe: savoir-faire, transmission, développement des savoirs, innovation (multinational, in cooperation with four States Parties, to be decided end of 2020)
    • Living together: minorities and majorities in the Danish-German border region (multinational, to be decided end of 2020)
    • Theatres and Orchestras in Germany and their socio-cultural spaces (to be decided end of 2019)
    • Midwifery (multinational and transcontinental)

    The German Commission for UNESCO

    The German Commission for UNESCO supports the implementation of the Convention for the Safeguarding of the Intangible Cultural Heritage in Germany. We foster the exchange of knowledge in the field of intangible cultural heritage and conduct projects, conferences and workshops in close collaboration with national and international partners.

    In 2012, the Office of Intangible Cultural Heritage has been established within the German Commission for UNESCO. The office is funded by the Federal Commissioner for Culture and the Media. Its mandate is to advise civil society, politics and science; to raise public awareness; to coordinate the procedure of inscription on the nationwide inventory of intangible cultural heritage and the selection procedure of nominations for UNESCO lists; to regularly update the nationwide inventory; and to establish and coordinate an expert committee.  

    The expert committee evaluates and recommends nomination files to be inscribed on the nationwide inventory. In addition, it recommends UNESCO nominations from Germany.

    In case of contact, please refer to ike(at)unesco.de.

    Additional article

    Nationwide Inventory

    Nationwide Inventory of Intangible Heritage

    Nationwide Inventory

    The Nationwide Inventory of Intangible Cultural Heritage illustrates which living cultural traditions and expressions are practiced and transmitted in Germany. It recognizes creative and diverse cultural expressions and their wealth of traditional knowledge.
    read more
    National Register of Good Safeguarding Practices
    Gute Praxisbeipspiele Collage

    Intangible Cultural Heritage

    National Register of Good Safeguarding Practices

    The Register illustrates successful and innovative programs and projects that are particularly in line with the principles and objectives of the Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage.
    read more